The Great Class of 1965

Newsletter - Fall 2005

Monterey Mini 2009
Monterey Mini Registration Form 2009
Calendar of Events
Homecoming 2008
Dartmouth College Fund
SixtyFives @ Sixty-Five Wrap-Up Photos
SixtyFives @ Sixty-Five Details
Fall Photos w Music
Dartmouth Winter CarniVAIL 2008 - WRAP
Dartmouth Winter CarniVAIL 2008
Sharing The Green
Bartlett Tower Society
Treasury Report 2007
Give Us Your News
News & Newsletters
Poison Ivy League
Leadership -- New & Past
Book: Herb West's Farewell
Books: "Ask Mike" - Gonnerman
Book: Q&As - Waterhouse
Reflections Of Dartmouth
Glee Club Jukebox
Madame Jeanette Lingers
Class Memoriam
Class Vietnam Memoriam
ARCHIVED: B'nBs/Pres Ltrs
Webster Hall Project
Webster Hall Donors
Contact: '65 Webmaster
Great Northern Lights Trading Post


The Great Dartmouth Class of 1965 Newsletter
Carl Boe, Editor-In-Chief

Welcome to my first Class Newsletter in our 41st year and our first electronic one!
Coming off our 40th reunion in June, we have below a interesting things to share.
Some items are links to pages... others you may find by scroll below.


-> Details: Homecoming  Mini-Reunion October, 21-3  MORE->
-> Our New President, Kenny Mac, comments  MORE->
-> 40th Reunion wrap by Roger Hansen & Pete Frederick  MORE-> 
-> Notes from Rich Joseph, John Tobin, Larry Hunt, Donald Hart, Bob Eckert &  Jack Heidbrink  MORE-> 
-> A set of ideas from Bob Blake for Out of Hanover Minis for your feedback;
-> A message from Jim Griffiths, Head Agent, on  Dartmouth and Giving
-> A notice: Alumni Association Meeting re. New Constitution reported by Bob Blake
-> A news article: Technology from Dartmouth – world’s smallest robot!
Let me also encourage you all to give us your email addresses.
Our plan is to start sending the ’65 Newsletter in color electronically as well as mono color by snail mail. Our e-advantage is that we can get information out faster, more often, and save the class money. Send your email address to or to me,  Also...  if you haven’t already done so, CLICK HERE to set up your permanent, forwardable, email address via the College's Vox Alumni Network.
A special thanks to John Sottile for helping me make this happen! 
Thanks and please send me comments via our e-Green Card or pulp one. 
Carl Boe
The Mini in Hanover this year is on October 21-23.
We have been steadily growing the group on hand for this yearly event at Pierce’s.
If you haven’t attended, please consider.
It’s a hoot!

OOH - Out Of Hanover Minis
file by
Bob Blake
In keeping with one of the themes of our new class administration, which is to provide more opportunities for classmates to get together, Bob Blake is planning our Out Of Hanover Minis, which -- probably in spring or summer -- will add to the existing our October, Fall gathering at Pierce’s and the Winter, March Ski Weekend in Vail, . Per Bob, “They may be weekends or travel/educational programs, possibly with a D Prof or join/customize a Dartmouth Alumni Trip, and will certainly include an appropriate ’65 turns 65 Birthday Celebration!  Current
possibilities include: California; Bend, OR; the Southwest; DC; Midwest; NY or Boston; Asheville, NC; Oxford, England; and Tuscany.  I’m looking for your ideas, and potentially your “help,” to make something happen.” 
Please contact Bob by phone: 781-235-3139, or email: with suggestions—place, best time of year, activities, attractions, etc. 


Lower File Is Large... Slow To Load

VAIL 5 in '05

Things I Recently Learned In Hanover

filed by

Jim Griffith, Head Agent


“Seven of your class officers just completed a very informative Class Officers' Weekend in Hanover. As your newly elected Head Agent, I learned a few specifics about undergrad Dartmouth that I wish to pass along:

       Tuition and Fees, as costly as they are right now, comprise only 41% of total revenues.
       Annual gifts to the Dartmouth College Fund (DCF) make up less than 10% of total revenues.
       95% of the students are satisfied with the quality of academic instruction.
       44% of the current student body is on scholarship, for a total of $36.5 million (11% of budget).

As a recipient of Dartmouth financial aid for four years, I find this last fact particularly interesting -- that annual DCF receipts do not cover undergraduate scholarships. In order to stay "need blind,"  The College gives away to students more than it receives in unrestricted gifts.


My goal as Head Agent this year is to continue building the dedicated team that Ed Keible worked with, and to focus on growing our class participation. DCF gifts of any size are important. It is interesting to note that last year 24,000 non-leadership gifts averaging $250 raised $6 million for current use. An added incentive to give to the DCF first is that every contribution also counts toward the new Campaign for the Dartmouth Experience until 2009.


I look forward to hearing from and working with many of my fellow '65s…you can expect to hear from me!”


Association of Alumni
New Constitution Proposal
To Be Presented At Mini
reported by
Bob Blake
“On Sunday 11:00 am, October 23, 2005, an important Meeting of the Association of Alumni (of which we all are members),  will be held at Alumni Hall, Hopkins Center. Brunch will be served.
Come meet the new VP for Alumni Relations, David Spalding '76, learn about and provide feedback for the proposed new Constitution for a reorganized, (and improved) Alumni Association, and VOTE on the new slate for the Association. 
The draft of the new constitution was presented at Class Officers Weekend, and is up on the Alumni Relations website along with a two-page summary and powerpoint comparison, old vs new.
Many good people have spent much time putting this together, in order to streamline alumni governance and bring a more workable organization into the 21st century.  A vote on the Constitution will be held later in the year, with all alumni able to cast ballots via mail, email, online; not just those who can get to Hanover!
At this meeting, there will be an election of a new slate for the Association of Alumni--it is important for everyone who can to be there to vote, since the Association's nominees will be contested, and in this case, only those present can vote.
The Association wants to move forward and improve governance and representation for all alumni--the contesting group does not want any change in the current archaic structure, no new Constitution, which keeps us back in the 20th century.  I would ask that everyone learn about the new Constitution, be informed, and go to the meeting to vote (which way is up to you, but a good showing should strengthen the alumni governance process for all of us)! Thank you.”

Dartmouth Researchers
Build World's Smallest Mobile Robot
Posted on Thursday, September 15 2005 - 12:57 AM
The BuzzFlood


In a world where “supersize” has entered the lexicon, there are some things getting smaller, like cell phones and laptops . Dartmouth researchers have contributed to the miniaturizing trend by creating the world's smallest untethered, controllable robot. Their extremely tiny machine is about as wide as a strand of human hair, and half the length of the period at the end of this sentence. About 200 of these could march in a line across the top of a plain M&M.
The researchers, led by Bruce Donald, the Joan P. and Edward J. Foley Jr. 1933 Professor of Computer Science at Dartmouth, report their creation in a paper that will be presented at the 12th International Symposium of Robotics Research in October in San Francisco, which is sponsored by the International Federation of Robotics Research. A longer, more detailed paper about this microrobot will also appear in a forthcoming issue of the Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems, a publication of the IEEE, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.
“It's tens of times smaller in length, and thousands of times smaller in mass than previous untethered microrobots that are controllable,” says Donald. “When we say 'controllable,' it means it's like a car; you can steer it anywhere on a flat surface, and drive it wherever you want to go. It doesn't drive on wheels, but crawls like a silicon inchworm, making tens of thousands of 10-nanometer steps every second. It turns by putting a silicon 'foot' out and pivoting like a motorcyclist skidding around a tight turn.”
The work was funded in part by the Department of Homeland Security, Office of Domestic Preparedness through Dartmouth's Institute for Security Technology Studies (ISTS).